The power of data in quantum machine learning

03 November 2020

Additional Info

  • Paper Title:

    Power of data in quantum machine learning

  • Paper Authors:

    Hsin-Yuan Huang,Michael Broughton, Masoud Mohseni, Ryan Babbush, Sergio Boixo, Hartmut Neven and Jarrod R. McClean (Google Research Venice)

Enhancing machine learning applications with quantum computing is currently being massively investigated, since it might prove quantum advantage during the NISQ era. Enhancement is typically performed through improvement of the training process of existing classical models or enhancing inference in graphical models. Another way is through the construction of quantum models that generate correlations between variables that are inefficient to represent through classical computation (e.g. quantum neural networks). If the model leverages a quantum circuit that is hard to sample results from classically, then there is potential for a quantum advantage.

The main message of this work is to show quantitatively that when classical models are provided with some training data, even if those were obtained from a quantum model that cannot be computed classically, they can reach similar performance as the quantum model. The authors provide rigorous prediction error bounds for training classical and quantum ML methods based on kernel functions in order to learn quantum mechanical models. It has been proven that kernel methods provide provable guarantees, but are also very flexible in the functions they can learn.

The main contribution of the author’s work lies in the development of quantum kernels and the implementation of a guidebook that generates ML problems which give a large separation between quantum and classical models. The use of prediction error bounds quantifies the separation between prediction errors of quantum and classical ML models for a fixed amount of training data. Typically, the comparison is done based on the geometric difference defined by the closest efficient classical ML model, however, in practice, one should consider the geometric difference with respect to a suite of optimized classical ML models. When the geometric difference is small then a classical ML method is guaranteed to provide similar or better performance in prediction on the data set, independent of the function values or labels. When the geometry differs greatly, there exists a data set that exhibits large prediction advantage using the quantum ML model.

The small geometric difference is a consequence of the exponentially large Hilbert space employed by existing quantum models, where all inputs are too far apart. To circumvent the setback, the authors propose an improvement which enlarges the geometric difference by projecting quantum states embedded from classical data back to approximate classical representation. This proposal allows for the construction of a data set that demonstrates large prediction advantage over common classical ML models in numerical experiments up to 30 qubits. In that way, one can use a small quantum computer to generate efficiently verifiable ML problems that could be challenging for classical ML models.

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